Saturday, July 20, 2013

DOTA 2 Launches on Mac and Linux


Valve's long-gestating Defense of the Ancients 2 has launched for Mac OS X and Linux. Between this and XCOM: Enemy Unknown, productivity is going to take a hit.

Full Story: HERE

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Half a King: Joe Abercrombie Writes Young Adult Trilogy

I can't quite decide how to feel about this news. Joe Abercrombie is writing a young adult trilogy called Half a King. Aimed at ages 12-16, the first book is finished and will be published in 2014:
Before some of you groan in horror at this wounding betrayal of all you believe in, I also wrote this with established readers, and indeed with a wider adult readership, very much in mind.  In some ways it’s a very similar sort of book to what I’ve written so far.  It’s fantasy, but light on the fantasy, and heavy on the vivid characters, the visceral action, the mixture of wit and cynicism, the twists and surprises.  I hope that it will have a wide appeal.  But I don’t feel that I’ve compromised on the way I’ve written.  I think it’s as tough, surprising, challenging, and morally ‘grey’ as the rest of my output.
Okay. I love Joe's work and I will no doubt pre-order and swallow whole anything he writes, but I wonder why the detour into YA fiction? There's no way of knowing, so I'll just have to wait and see how it turns out.

Full Story: HERE

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Friday, July 19, 2013

The Name of the Wind T.V. Series

Tor has a notice up that Patrick Rothfuss' The Name of the Wind is coming to television:
Deadline has just announced that 20th Century Fox has optioned the television rights to Patrick Rothfuss’ epic fantasy trilogy The Kingkiller Chronicles to develop into an ongoing series. Eric Heisserer (Hours, The Thing) is attached to adapt the series as its executive producer. 
The show will begin with the events of The Name of the Wind and follow through the other two books in the trilogy. No word yet on how the show will otherwise be structured, or if they will incorporate aspects of Rothfuss’ planned works after the Kingkiller trilogy
Curious about the world (worlds?) of Kvothe? Visit our extremely detailedPatrick Rothfuss reread, curated by Jo Walton.
Source: Tor.com

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Wednesday, July 10, 2013

Joe Abercrombie on 'The Last Of Us'

Joe writes here about The Last Of Us, which is, thus far, my favourite game of 2013:
Let me be clear.  From its title to its final scene, it is a superb experience.  Raw, thrilling, affecting, uncompromising.  Quite possibly the best tightly scripted game I ever played.  This may be the old generation of hardware, but it is a new generation, a quantum leap, a brave new world in character, story, setting, and, you guessed it, emotional involvement.
Full Story: HERE

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Thursday, July 4, 2013

A Movement Within Fantasy

Mr. Joe Abercrombie continues to answer reader mail. This week he tackles a question about a 'third wave' movement in fantasy and if he sees himself as part of it:
The truth of the matter, as far as I can remember it, is much less impressive.  I played a lot of role-playing games and read a lot of epic fantasy as a kid, got a bit bored with the way it seemed to stick closely to a predictable formula, largely stopped reading it at the start of the 90s and read other things.  Then I read GRRM’s Game of Thrones and saw that it was possible to do something daring, unpredictable, gritty and character-centred while still writing in the commercial core of the genre – I saw a lot of what I felt had been missing very clearly expressed in that series.  Some time after that, in 2001, I think, and largely because I found myself with time on my hands as a freelance TV editor, I started trying to write, initially without the slightest expectation of being published.  My aim, insofar as I had one, was to produce my take on a classic epic fantasy trilogy, very much in the vein of Lord of the Rings, David Eddings or Dragonlance, but with a tight focus on vivid characters with setting very much a backdrop, a grittiness and hence a punch and drive to the action, a lot of twists in the plot (almost a mystery plot, in a way), a stripped-down modernity to the prose, and above all a sense of humour.
Full Story: HERE

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