Saturday, January 26, 2013

Game of Thrones Season 3 Photos


Tor has the scoop on 30 new photos from season 3 of Game of Thrones and there's some great stuff there: Ciaran Hinds!  Diana fucking Rigg!

I like to think that when her agent phoned about the role of Brienne, actor Gwendoline Christie (above) said, "What? They want me because of my size?"

Game of Thrones third season launches Sunday March 31st on HBO.

Full Story: HERE

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Thursday, January 24, 2013

The Sandman Reread: The Doll's House


Tor continues its reread of Neil Gaiman's excellent Sandman series with The Doll's House:
Here, Neil Gaiman expands the mythology of Sandman—we’ve already met Dream and Death of the Endless, but now we meet sweet and manipulative and vicious Desire and the hideous Despair—and that is another of Gaiman’s great achievements in the series: he creates a clear mythological structure that allows him to play with sibling rivalry on an epic scale while also providing embodiments for all the facets of humanity. Gaiman’s mythology doesn’t strain to present itself as meaningful, or to justify the connections between the characters in some kind of Tolkeinesque ancestral map, it just reminds us of the archetypal structures that we’ve already built in our minds. Dream and Death and Desire and Despair do exist, for us, and Gaiman gives them form, and, more importantly, personality.
Full Story: HERE

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Wednesday, January 23, 2013

Joe Abercrombie Reveals New Trilogy

Mr. Joe Abercrombie has updated his blog, outlining his plans to take a good rest now that the admin duties on Red Country are all done.  Most relevant to my interests is the revelation that he's planning another trilogy set in the word of The First Law:
I’ve got a contract for three more books in the First Law world, and those will be a trilogy, and I have some rough ideas about what the content and characters might be.  Very rough.  But this time around, I’ve scarcely started even on the planning.  With every book I’ve finished I’ve told myself (not to mention promised close family members) that I’d take a break, and each time after about an hour off I’ve started getting twitchy about the next thing and cracked straight on.
Full Story: HERE

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Thursday, January 17, 2013

The Sandman Reread


Tor loves to reread stuff.  They reread things they've only just read and then reread them again to be sure what they read was to their taste. Their latest target is Neil Gaiman's Sandman series of comic books (or 'graphic novels' if you're sensitive about being seen reading a 'comic book').  I'm not a big comic book reader - I've recently enjoyed the excellent Dungeons and Dragons series from IDW publishing (and I hated Alan Moore's Watchmen, another high profile title I thought I should read) - but Sandman remains the best comic book series I've ever read.

Gaiman uses the long imprisonment of Morpheus as the engine for practically the entire series. Morpheus was the cork holding the dream-stuff inside the bottle, and he spends several story arcs worth of his time trying to clean up the mess others left behind when he wasn’t there to stop it. More importantly, perhaps, Gaiman shows us what it’s like when our hero isn’t there. I mean, he’s on the page, but he’s impotent, shackled. The loss of Dream means the loss, to a large degree, of story. And if Sandman is about anything, and it is, it’s about the power of story. This whole series is like the pilgrims headed to Canterbury, taking turns telling their tales. It’s Scheherazade weaving fictions to stay alive. It’s Neil Gaiman, building a structure through which he can tell a multitude of stories from different times and different places, but with the advantage of a single narrative thrust to tie it all together.
Full Story: HERE

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Friday, January 11, 2013

Stephen King Reread: Different Seasons


Tor continues their Stephen King reread with King's first collection of novellas, which includes Rita Hayworth and the Shawshank Redemption and The Body (which would be made into the movie Stand By Me):
In an interview, King once said, “I’ve never met a kid I thought was genuinely mean,” and his fascination with the glory and grotesquerie of childhood shows in the large number of his classic  characters who are children: Carrie White in Carrie, Mark Petrie in ’Salem’s Lot, Danny Torrance in The Shining, Charlie McGee in Firestarter, Chris Chambers in “The Body,” all the kids in It, and on and on. With this many young protagonists in his books it’s no wonder that so many people first fall in love with Stephen King in early adolescence. King, unlike a lot of writers, has always played fair with his kids, refusing to patronize them, but refusing to sentimentalize them as well. But “Apt Pupil” feels so out-of-character that it’s hard to believe it came from the same writer.
Full Story: HERE

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Monday, January 7, 2013

Saladin Ahmed on Worldbuilding

Happy 2013!  Wow!  That sure is a sci-fi date; in my head it's still 1994.  Like Billy Pilgrim, I feel like I've come unstuck from time, am floating free in history.

Enough of that blathering.  Saladin Ahmed has strung together some words related to worldbuilding:
Even among writers and readers who agree upon the importance of world-building, there is great disagreement over how to do it right. A thousand blog posts have been launched arguing over how much detail ought to be revealed to the reader. Jordan's Wheel of Time series, in particular, is a sort of perennial target of parody, even among die-hard fans, padded as it can be with relentless descriptions of clothing, hairstyles, furniture and food. And Martin can spend page after exhausting page detailing the coat-of-arms of every attendee at a royal banquet. For readers used to the protocols of literary fiction, novels that come with glossaries and appendices can feel distinctly like homework.
Full Story: HERE

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