Sunday, December 30, 2012

Joe Abercrombie writes about The Hobbit Movie

With his usual style and analysis Joe Abercrombie has written up his thoughts on The Hobbit, and, like many other reviewers I've seen, finds it wanting:
To be fair, for a three hour film it never really got boring, I wasn’t squirming in my seat or anything, but, man, it really did feel padded out beyond recognition, with barely a sequence or conversation left intact and offhand allusions in the book converted into weighty additions.  An interminable pre-title with the elder Bilbo, a ponderous exchange between Gandalf, Saruman and Galadriel, an utterly unnecessary aside with Radagast.  I felt like I must be watching the extended edition, where every scene goes on just that bit longer than it needs to.  Sometimes a lot longer.  Sometimes even longer than that.  I thought they cut and sculpted the Lord of the Rings books very well for the original films but, you know, it’s one thing – surely a tricky, skilled and difficult thing but one thing all the same – to cut down a wealth of source material and maintain the feel.  It’s entirely another to add great wodges of your own stuff to quite slight material.  The dialogue in those new sections clunked, the voice-over creaked, and for me it ended up just not feeling very much like the Hobbit at all.
Full Story: HERE

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Friday, December 28, 2012

N.K.Jemisin Picks Her Most Anticipated Games of 2013

Over at The Book Smugglers, N.K.Jemisin (author of the excellent Inheritance trilogy) has selected her most anticipated games of 2013:
Anyway, I’m still very much of a gamer, even though I have less free time now. I also have less patience for games’ failings, which is why I no longer play some of the franchises I once loved. Still, there’s enough good stuff out there that at least tries not to insult my existence as a human being, or my intelligence as a grownup and a writer, that I keep playing. So on the theory that you care what media us writer-folk are consuming in our spare time, here’s a short list of what I’m salivating for in 2013.
DmC is on my list as well :)

Full Story: HERE

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Saturday, December 15, 2012

Not Saving The World? How Does That Even Work?


Over at Tor.com, Jo Walton notices no one 'saves the world' in Scott Lynch's excellent Lies of Locke Lamora series:
Where saving the world came into fantasy was with The Lord of the Rings, and where Tolkien got it from was from Christianising Ragnarok. In Norse Mythology, the world is going to be destroyed and that’s all there is to it. It’s the inevitable end. There are versions where a couple of Thor’s sons will survive to see a new world, but in any case, this world that we love and care about will end in battle and destruction and dead heroes will rise again to fight at the side of the gods and be destroyed again and that’s the end. It’s inevitable. It’s always there. In writing LOTR Tolkien went with this kind of end of everything—if Sauron wins, there won’t even be anyone left to sing songs or tell stories. The ultimate victory of good, which happens through the operation of grace and not through the will (never mind power) of the heroes, is Tolkien’s Christianising of this deeply pagan myth. It was a very original thing to do, that eucatastrope.
Full Story: HERE

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Friday, December 7, 2012

Tor: Historically Authentic Sexism In Fantasy


Terrific article over at Tor.com about sexism in fantasy fiction:
Rome was a highly superstitious society which relied on all manner of rituals to feel safe and protected. Those rituals which were performed within the home were as important as those performed in public places—but they weren’t written about to the same extent because they were mostly done by women, often exclusively by women, and secrecy was a common element. There are many reasons why men didn’t write down the details (except when they interacted with court cases) and one of those reasons was, they didn’t know what those details were. Women’s history, sadly, was not much of a thing, and what words women did write down were not preserved over the next millennium.
Full Story: HERE

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Thursday, December 6, 2012

Stephen King Re-read: The Shining


Over at Tor there's a terrific article about Stephen King's The Shining:
Few books cut as close to the bone as The Shining: an alcoholic schoolteacher with a family to support writes his way to financial security, then turns around and writes a book about an alcoholic schoolteacher with a family to support who fails to make good on his talent and tries to murder his family. “I was the guy who had written The Shining without even realizing that I was writing about myself,” he says in On Writing
Full Story: HERE

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Wednesday, December 5, 2012

Steven Erikson Answers 'Reaper's Gale' Questions

Now that Tor has finished their re-read of Reaper's Gale, Steven Erikson showed up to answer any questions folks have about the book:
His entire story is madness—the whole, pointless war, all ratcheting up to campaigns of genocide, where the victims end up acquiring the heartlessness of the oppressors. But the essential point is, it took a man like Redmask to drag the tribes into annihilation, and the crux to that is his hidden origins (from a system that knows no other language of living, no other way of viewing the world). Without Redmask, the Awl would have continued to retreat, continued to crumble on the edges when contacted by an overbearing, autocratic, self-obsessed society—one with the military might to impose its will, and the quasi-religious certainty that it has the right to do so.
Full Story: HERE

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Monday, December 3, 2012

Game of Thrones: Season 3 Tease


Winter is coming.

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